How to dye hair evenly with roots step by step – Unify your hair color today

how to unify them

How to Dye Your Roots and Hair to Create a Uniform Color?

 

And to answer that question, we need to know what happened to your hair.

Did you use a different color to touch up your roots? Or did things go wrong when you tried to change your hair color, resulting in roots that were a different color than the rest of your hair?

 

No matter why you ended up in this situation, don’t panic. There’s a solution to each of these problems.

  • If your roots are lighter than the rest of your hair, apply a darker color to your roots only to even it out.
  • If your roots are darker than the rest of your hair, dying the rest of your hair the same color as roots will create a uniform color.
  • If you want to even out the color difference between your roots and the rest of your hair by dying all of it a new color, you can apply the dye to all of your hair, but you have to choose the right color. We’ll discuss that in a moment.

 

It’s logical to think that applying the same color of hair dye from the roots to the ends of your hair will create one uniform color.

But there’s an exception to every rule.  And those exceptions sometimes make what is many women’s worst fear become a reality: a slight -or not so slight- differences of color between the roots and the rest of the hair. 

Would you like to know one exception to the rule?

 

When you apply the same color, but a different tone.

To make the point more clear, let’s take a look at Ana’s story, a client who has had blond hair for months.

But her hair was an utter disaster at her last visit. Her roots were orange while the rest of her hair was a golden blond.

 

I didn’t have to look very far to find the reason why. I already knew Ana had gone on vacation and did her own color maintenance.

Which was great, except she knew nothing about color theory and has touched up her roots with the wrong color.

 

 When she bought her color kit, she didn’t take into account that hair dye comes with a number that shows both the color and a tone, to help consumers avoid an uneven color. 

But instead of buying a golden blond, she has bought a strawberry blond, which is why the color was so different in the roots and the rest of your hair.

Would you like to know how to fix this slight -but annoying- color difference?

 

You can find out the answer in this article, as well as:

  • How to touch up your roots so they match the rest of your hair
  • How to change your hair color to a single, even color
  • How to correctly apply hair dye to even out the color

 

 

How to Retouch Your Roots to Match the Rest of Your Hair

hair color kits different brands

Regular Color maintenance is very important to keep your hair looking neat and tidy, and it’s important that you use the same color each time you touch it up.

But how do you know exactly what hair color you have? By checking both the color and tone.

 

Remember Ana? The mistake she made was to apply a color with a different tone than the rest of your hair.

The tone is the second number, which comes after the period. For example, Anna has 8.3 golden blond hair, but she applied 8.4 strawberry blond hair dye.

 

Although the difference appears minimal, it’s not. That difference caused her roots to become a different color than the rest of her hair.

 The solution is to apply a dye that covers and neutralizes the two tones that you already applied. 

 

In Ana’s case, for example, since she had 8.4 strawberry blond roots and the rest of her hair was an 8.3 golden blond, she had two options: a 9.1 light ash blond, or a 7.1 dark ash blond.

Ash tones neutralize both golden and red tones and applying one tone lighter or darker evens out the color, which is how we got to the color 7.1.

 

So, if you want to even out your hair color, choose a shade from the same palette. For example:

  • If your hair is a level 7 blond and you applied a level 8 light blond to your roots, applying a level 6 light brown would even the color.
  • If your hair is a level 6 light brown and you applied a level 7 dark blond to your roots, you could either apply a level 8 light blond or a level 6 light brown.

 

If you applied the same shade but with a different tone, make sure to apply a dye with a tone that neutralizes the tones in your hair.

If you dyed your roots a color lighter than the rest of your hair, dying them darker will even out the color. If you dyed your roots a color darker than the rest of your hair, you should apply that same color to the rest of your hair.

 

How to Match Your Roots to The Rest of Your Hair With a New Color

You can also create a uniform shade by dying all of your hair a new color. Of course, to do this you'll have to apply the dye to all of your hair

But you can't just pick any dye. There's a few details to keep in mind:

  • If you want to dye your hair a lighter color, apply a color one tone lighter than your current color. This way you can gradually lighten your hair color without bleaching it.
  • On the other hand, if you want to darken your hair, never go more than two tones darker in one application.

 

If you want an even hair color, it’s important to apply the dye correctly. Let’s take a look at how to apply hair dye.

 

How to Dye Your Hair an Even Color

Matching the color with a touch-up is different than changing the color completely, so we’re going to look at these two situations separately.

 

Changing your Hair Color to Create an Even Shade

Simply changing your hair color is the easiest option, because all you have to do is mix the product and start dyeing. That being said, there’s are a few thing you should keep in mind:

  •  If you've chosen a lighter color, first apply it to all your hair except for the roots, let it process for twenty minutes, and then apply it to the roots.  If you dye all your hair at once, you run the risk of your roots turning out lighter than the rest of your hair.
  • Once you've applied all of the product, let it process for 40 minutes, and then rinse.

This way all of your hair will be one even, uniform color.

 

Even Out the Color With a Touch-Up

If you choose this option, make sure to choose a color that can balance the two shades.

  • If you want to match the two shades with a lighter color  make sure to apply the product to your ponytail and ends, wait twenty minutes, and then apply it to your roots. 
  • If you decide to go to a darker tone, you can simply apply it to all of your hair, from the roots to the ends.

 

Conclusion

While color theory isn't rocket science, it is a science.

So, if you want to even out the color difference between your roots and the rest of your hair, make sure to choose the correct color.

 

And there are four ways to do that:

  • Apply a darker color to your roots
  • Apply the color of the rest of your hair to your roots
  • Dye all of your hair one shade lighter
  • Dye all your hair up to two shades darker

What option would you choose?

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