I dyed my hair and only my roots change color, what can I do?

  • If your roots ended up lighter than the rest of your hair, then you should use the same color dye on just your roots, mixing it with a 10 volume developer.
  • If you have dark hair, and your roots turned out darker than the rest of your hair, you should use a dye in the same color as the rest of your hair to even out the color.
  • Now if your hair is very light and your roots turned out darker than the rest, you’ll need to bleach the roots, then use the dye again.
  • And if only the roots changed color when you dyed your hair, you should do a bleach bath and use the dye again. And I’ll tell you how to do that in just a moment.

 

how to unify them

When I received this question in my email, my first reaction was to say that the best course of action would be to even out your root color with the rest of your hair by using a dye.

But, considering the question a little deeper, I realized I wasn’t sure about one thing: What exactly did this person mean when they said that only their roots had changed color?

 

  • What happened?
  • Were their roots lighter or darker?
  • Did the dye only take in the roots?

Since this is a pretty complex issue, we’ll take a look at each of these possibilities to decide what happened in each case and why.

 

Let’s start with the first option. If your roots turned out lighter than the rest of your hair, then developer, which is what you mix with the dye, lightened your hair.  And if that is the case, then the solution is easy. All you’ll need to do is use the dye again. 

 

Your roots could have turned out darker than the rest of your hair, not lighter,  and in that case, the solution will depend on your hair color. If you have dark hair, then your roots probably turned out darker because the dye you used was too dark. 

But, if you have light hair, your roots turned out darker because you didn’t bleach them before using the dye.

 

And it’s also possible that when you finished dyeing your hair, once it dried, you realized that only the roots changed color. How could that have happened?

Because damaged ends are much more porous and absorb more dye pigment.  And the solution to this would be to lightly bleach them.  

 

Since I know this is a lot of information and I want you to find the solution to your specific issue, let’s take a closer look at each problem and solution. That way, you’ll be able to have an even color throughout your hair, no matter what situation you’re in.

As such, I’m going to tell you:

  • How to even out your color when your roots turned out lighter than the rest of your hair
  • How to even out your color when your roots turned out darker than the rest of your hair
  • How to even out your color when only your roots absorbed the dye

 

How to even out your color when your roots turned out lighter than the rest of your hair

lighten to even out all hair color

Like I said before, the origin of this problem is that the 20 volume developer that you probably used lightened your roots’ color. Why?

 

Because 20 volume developer lightens up hair to two shades. But, in addition to this, when you use the dye at the same time on your roots, the middle of your hair, and the ends, the dye will work differently on each part.

 Your roots are always warmer than your ends because of how close they are to your scalp. And the heat accelerates the dyeing process. 

Do you know how to prevent this?

 

You should always use the dye in the middle of your hair and the ends first, leaving about an inch of hair at your roots without dye.

After the dye has been in your hair for about 20 minutes, then you can use the rest of the mix on your roots and leave it all in 10 more minutes. Then, rinse it all out.

This way you’ll stop your roots from turning out lighter than the rest of your hair next time. But, now it’s time to solve the problem already in your hair. How?

 

 By using the dye on your hair again, but this time with a 10 volume developer, since it cannot lighten your hair. And of course, you should only use it on your roots. 

three percent peroxide

Once you have the 10 volume developer and the dye, you can start.

  • To make the mixture, you should use the tube of dye and the 10 volume developer. If you bought a color kit, don’t use the developer that comes with it because it will be a 20 volume developer.
  • Use the mix on your roots and leave it in for 20-30 minutes, then rinse with plenty of water.
  • Now your color should be even.

 

How to even out your color when your roots turned out darker than the rest of your hair

quantities for the mix

Like I told you at the beginning, there are two main reasons why this may have happened:

  • You used a darker dye than you should have.
  • Or, if you have really light hair, you didn’t bleach your roots.

 

  • If you used the wrong dye, you should use the same color dye that you used before.

To do this, you need the same color dye you used before. And where should you start applying it to your hair?

 

That’s right! Good job listening closely.

You’ll start at the middle and ends of your hair, leaving the dye in for 20 minutes, and then using it on your roots.

How long should you leave it on your roots? About 10 minutes. Then, your roots and the rest of your hair will look even.

 

  • Now if you have very light hair and your roots turned out dark, the solution is different because you’ll need to bleach them, using a 20 volume developer and bleach powder. Then, you can use the dye.

Because if you use the dye directly on your roots without bleaching them, the color will turn out darker.

 

  • Brush your hair.
  • Mix the 20 volume developer and bleach powder in a plastic container.
  • Use the mix only on your roots and leave it in for 10-15 minutes, then rinse.
  • Dry your hair and use the dye on your roots again.

 

Remember that it’s always important to bleach your roots when you’re using extra light dyes.

 

How to even out your color when only your roots absorbed the dye

safe for hair

If you noticed that only your roots changed color when you finished dyeing your hair, then you’re dealing with color saturation.

Every time you use a dye on your hair, your hair fiber absorbs it and changes color. But, when you’ve been dyeing your hair for a long time, your hair fiber can fill or get “saturated,” and it can’t absorb the new pigment.

But why did just your roots change color, if you always dye all of your hair?

 

 Because since the hair at your roots is the newest hair you have, it hasn’t been through any bleach or dye processing, while the ends of your hair must have absorbed dye at least 5-6 times. As such, the ends are saturated while your roots aren’t.  

 

The first thing you need to do to fix this problem is to get rid of some of the color in the rest of your hair with a bleach bath, which is a type of processing a little less harmful than bleaching it outright.

  • Mix your normal shampoo and a 20 volume developer in an empty container. You can choose a hydrating shampoo with keratin to protect your hair during this process.
  • Do not do the bleach bath while you are showering.
  • Wet your hair and apply the bleach bath to your hair, massaging it to create plenty of foam, then leave it in for 20 minutes.
  • Rinse and dry.

 

 Don’t freak out when you see your hair color after the bleach bath because you still need to use the dye, which should be the same one you used before. 
  • Brush and dry your hair.
  • Mix the tube of dye with the developer.
  • Start using the dye on the middle and ends of your hair and leave it in for 20 minutes. Then, use the rest of the dye on your roots and leave it in for 10 minutes.
  • Wash your hair using shampoo and conditioner.

 

Now your hair color will be totally even without any dividing color lines.

 

Conclusions

It’s always important to start using dye on the middle and ends of your hair first to avoid your roots turning out a different color than the rest of your hair.

After 20 minutes have gone by, you can continue by using the dye on your roots and wait 10 minutes.

Then, your color will be even, and you won’t see any difference between your roots and the rest of your hair.

Now you know how to fix roots that turned out a different color this time and how to avoid it happening again in the future.

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